About

 

The National Cattle Comfort Maps on CattleComfort.Mesonet.US were developed and are maintained by the Oklahoma Mesonet, part of the Oklahoma Climatological Survey housed at the University of Oklahoma. Product development was a joint venture between Oklahoma Mesonet professionals and faculty in the Department of Animal Science at Oklahoma State University.

 

The National Cattle Comfort Maps project was supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant No. 2014-67004-21624 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

 

The National Cattle Comfort Index Maps are produced hourly at three solar radiation levels. Users can determine which solar radiation level is appropriate for  their local conditions. The solar radiation levels include:

• Cattle Comfort Index at 100% solar radiation

• Cattle Comfort Index at 60% solar radiation

• Cattle Comfort Index at 20% solar radiation

 

Weather variable reference maps produced hourly are:

• Air temperature 1.5 meter in Fahrenheit

• Wind speed 10 meters in miles per hour

• Percent relative humidity 1.5 meter

• Solar radiation at 100% of estimated local maximum in watts per meter squared

• Solar radiation at 60% of estimated local maximum in watts per meter squared

• Solar radiation at 20% of estimated local maximum in watts per meter squared

 

All maps are labelled with the date and are time stamped in Eastern Daylight Time.

Hourly weather data are from the NOAA National Weather Service METAR database. The Oklahoma Mesonet does not quality assure National Weather Service METAR data. 

 

National Cattle Comfort Maps Team Members:

University of Oklahoma Oklahoma State University Kansas State University
Rafal Jabrzemski, Ph.D., Oklahoma Climatological Survey Albert Sutherland, CPH, CCA, Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Megan Rolf, Ph.D., Department of Animal Sciences and Industry
Mike Klatt, Oklahoma Climatological Survey Chris Richards, Ph.D., Department of Animal Science  
Adam Burt, Oklahoma Climatological Survey Sara Place, Ph.D., Department of Animal Science  
Ada Shih, Oklahoma Climatological Survey    
Jay Price, Oklahoma Climatological Survey    
Reuben Reyes, Oklahoma Climatological Survey    

 

The National Cattle Comfort Maps are an expansion of the Oklahoma Cattle Comfort Advisor that provides forecast and historical Cattle Comfort Data based on Local Oklahoma Mesonet weather. Oklahoma producers are encouraged to use the Oklahoma Cattle Advisor under the Agriculture tab at Mesonet.org. The Oklahoma Cattle Advisor was developed through a partnership between the Oklahoma Mesonet and the Oklahoma State University Department of Animal Science and Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service. Team Members included: Albert Sutherland, Chris Richards, David Lalman, Greg Highfill, and Bob LeValley.

 

Additional USDA AFRI Grant 2014-67004-21624 Team Members:

• Michelle Calvo-Lorenzo, Ph.D., Oklahoma State University; current: Elanco Animal Health

• Udaya DeSilva, Ph.D., Oklahoma State University

• Clint Krehbiel, Ph.D., University of Nebraska at Lincoln

• Raluca Mateescu, Ph.D., University of Florida

• Deborah VanOverbeke, Ph.D., Oklahoma State University

 

National Cattle Comfort Index values are based on the formula published in “*A comprehensive index for assessing environmental stress in animals*” by T. L. Mader, L. J. Johnson and J. B. Gaughan in the Journal of Animal Science 2010, 88:2153-2165. A formula correction was later published in Erratum to “A comprehensive index for assessing environmental stress in animals” (J. Anim. Sci. 88:2153–2165) by T. L. Mader, L. J. Johnson, and J. B. Gaughan in Journal of Animal Science 2011, 89:2955.

 

The comprehensive climate index put forth by Mader, Johnson and Gaughan uses solar radiation, relative humidity, and wind speed to adjust air temperature in degrees Fahrenheit to estimate the heat or cold stress that livestock are exposed to in an outdoor environment without shade or windbreaks. The model runs year-round and indexes both heat stress and cold stress in a single model.